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Awards

COMBAT AND COMMENDATION MEDALS

  1. Distinguished Service Cross

    History

    The Distinguished Service Cross was established by President Woodrow Wilson on January 2, 1918. General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Forces in France, had recommended that recognition other than the Medal of Honor, be authorized for the Armed Forces of the United States for service rendered, in like manner, to that awarded by the European Armies. The request for establishment of the medal was forwarded from the Secretary of War to the President in a letter dated December 28, 1917. The Act of Congress establishing this award (193-65th Congress) dated July 9, 1918 is contained in Title 10 United States Code (USC) 3742. The establishment of the Distinguished Service Cross was promulgated in War Department General Order No. 6, dated January 12, 1918.

    Prerequisites

    The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces). It is awarded for extraordinary heroism:
    While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States;
    While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
    While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.
    Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor.

  2. Silver Star

    History

    The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations." Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.

    Prerequisites

    The Silver Star is the third-highest military combat decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Armed Forces. It is awarded for gallantry in action:

    While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States; While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. Actions that merit the Silver Star must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the meet Medal of Honor or the Distinguished Service Cross.

  3. Distinguished Flying Cross

    History

    Awarded for heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight.

    Prerequisites

    Recipient must distinguish themselves in support of operations by showing "great heroism or extraordinary action" in an aerial flight as Pilot or Crew. May be awarded for a single action or series of actions that go above and beyond the normal duties of an aviator.

  4. Bronze Star

    History

    General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen’s morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.

    Prerequisites

    The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded for meritorious achievement or meritorious service according to the following:

    Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or meritorious service. The lesser degree than that required for the award of the Legion of Merit must nevertheless have been meritorious and accomplished with distinction.

    Award may be made to each member of the Armed Forces of the United States who has been cited in orders or awarded a certificate for exemplary conduct in ground combat against an armed enemy. For this purpose, an award of the Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge is considered as a citation in orders.

  5. Soldier's Medal

    History

    The Soldier's Medal is awarded to any person while serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States distinguished himself or herself by heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy.

    Prerequisites

    Awarded to soldiers selected as Soldier of the Quarter.

  6. Purple Heart

    History

    The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by General George Washington by order from his headquarters at Newburgh, New York, August 7, 1782. The writings of General Washington quoted in part: "The General ever desirous to cherish a virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military Merit, directs that whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings over the left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth or silk, edged with narrow lace or binding. Not only instances of unusual gallantry, but also of extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way shall meet with a due reward". So far as the known surviving records show, this honor badge was granted to only three men, all of them noncommissioned officers: Sergeant Daniel Bissell of the 2d Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line; Sergeant William Brown of the 5th Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line, and Sergeant Elijah Churchill of the 2d Continental Dragoons, which was also a Connecticut Regiment. The original Purple Heart depicted on the first page is a copy of the badge awarded to Sergeant Elijah Churchill and is now owned by the New Windsor Cantonment, National Temple Hill Association, PO Box 525, Vails Gate, NY 12584. The only other known original badge is the badge awarded to Sergeant William Brown and is in the possession of The Society of the Cincinnati, New Hampshire Branch but differs in design by not having any lettering embroidered on the heart and the leaves are at the top only with a larger spray of leaves at the base. Subsequent to the Revolution, the Order of the Purple Heart had fallen into disuse and no further awards were made. By Order of the President of the United States, the Purple Heart was revived on the 200th Anniversary of George Washington's birth, out of respect to his memory and military achievements, by War Department General Orders No. 3, dated 22 February 1932. The criteria was announced in War Department Circular dated 22 February 1932 and authorized award to soldiers, upon their request, who had been awarded the Meritorious Service Citation Certificate or were authorized to wear wound chevrons subsequent to 5 April 1917. During the early period of World War II (7 Dec 41 to 22 Sep 43), the Purple Heart was awarded both for wounds received in action against the enemy and for meritorious performance of duty. With the establishment of the Legion of Merit, by an Act of Congress, the practice of awarding the Purple Heart for meritorious service was discontinued. By Executive Order 9277, dated 3 December 1942, the decoration was extended to be applicable to all services and the order required that regulations of the Services be uniform in application as far as practicable. This executive order also authorized award only for wounds received.

    Prerequisites

    In Armed Assault, the Purple Heart is awarded to soldiers who, while engaged in an official combat operation are wounded in combat and successfully finish the mission while in a position of leadership, this can only be awarded once per official Campaign.

  7. Air Medal

    History

    The Air Medal is awarded to anyone who distinguishes himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.

    Prerequisites

    Awarded for performing outstanding flight-related duties while in a combat zone. Must be assigned an MOS such as Detachment Commander, Pilot, or Crew. May be awarded with a Combat "V" for Valor for an act of meritorious action or bravery against an armed enemy less than the criteria for the Distinguished Flying Cross. 

  8. Army Commendation Medal

    History

    In a summary sheet, 5 November 1945, WDGAP, Personnel Division recommended that an Army Commendation Ribbon of distinctive design be established to recognize meritorious service in an area at a time for which the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded. The recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War and the ribbon was established by War Department Circular 377, dated 18 December 1945. This circular authorized award to "members of the Armed Forces of the United States serving in any capacity with the Army for meritorious service rendered since 7 December 1941, not in sustained operational activities against an enemy nor in direct support of such operation, i.e., in areas and at times when the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded because of its operational character". Authority to award the Commendation Ribbon was delegated to Major Generals or commanders of any command, force or installation normally commanded by Major Generals.

    Prerequisites

    The Army Commendation Medal shall be awarded to soldiers for outstanding performance or achievement in a combat leadership role. Can be awarded for achievement in action in a competitive match below that required for a Bronze Star. In case of a combat award, the V device shall be attached.

  9. Good Conduct Medal

    History

    The Good Conduct Medal was established by Executive Order 8809, dated 28 June 1941, and authorized the award for soldiers completing three years active service after that date. The criteria was amended by Executive Order 9323, dated 31 March 1943, to authorize award for three years service after 7 December 1941 or one year service while the United States is at war. Executive Order 10444, dated 10 April 1953, revised the criteria to authorize award for three years service after 27 August 1940; one year service after 7 December 1941 while the United States is at war; and award for the first award for service after 27 June 1950 upon termination of service, for periods less than three years, but more than one year. The medal was designed by Mr. Joseph Kiselewski and approved by the Secretary of War on 30 October 1942. The eagle, with wings spread, denotes vigilance and superiority. The horizontal sword denotes loyalty, and the book represents knowledge acquired and ability gained. On the reverse, the lone star denotes merit. The wreath of laurel and oak leaves denotes reward and strength. The second and subsequent awards are indicated by the wear of the clasp with loop on the ribbon. Bronze clasps indicate the second (two loops) through fifth award (five loops); silver clasps indicate sixth (one loop) through tenth award (five loops); and gold clasps indicate eleventh (one loop) through the fifteenth award (5 loops).

    Prerequisites

    The Good Conduct Medal shall be awarded to enlisted soldiers for meeting a high standard of efficiency, loyalty and duty (3 months of consecutive service) in the performance of their squad or DMOS functions to a level below that required for the Army Commendation Medal.

  10. Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal

    History

    The Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal (MOVSM) was established by Executive Order 12830, 9 January 1993. It may be awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States and their Reserve Components, who subsequent to 31 December 1992, perform outstanding volunteer community service of a sustained direct and consequential nature.

    Prerequisites

    The Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal shall be awarded to any soldier who donates in excess of $50 in any calendar month. A "V" device is added for donations in excess of $100 in any calendar month. 

UNIT CITATIONS

  1. Distinguished Unit Citation, DUC

    History

    The Distinguished Unit Citation was established as a result of Executive Order No. 9075, dated 26 February 1942. The Executive Order directed the Secretary of War to issue citations in the name of the President of the United States to Army units for outstanding performance of duty after 7 December 1941. The design submitted by the Office of the Quartermaster General was approved by the G1 on 30 May 1942.

    Prerequisites

    The Distinguished Unit Citation shall be awarded to any unit of the 101st Airborne Division for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy by order of the commander.

SKILL BADGES

  1. 101st Airborne Division Unit Patch

    History

    The 101st Division headquarters was organized 2 November 1918 at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, having been constituted on 23 July in the National Army. World War I ended 9 days later, and was demobilized on 11 December 1918.

    In 1921, the division headquarters was reconstituted in the Organized Reserves, and organized on 10 September 1921, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It was at this time that the "Screaming Eagle" became associated with the division, as a successor to the traditions of the Wisconsin volunteer regiments of the American Civil War.

    As part of the reorganization of the 101st as an airborne division in the Army of the United States, the reserve division was disbanded on 15 August 1942.

    Prerequisites
    The 101st Airborne Division unit patch shall be awarded to soldiers that serve with distinction, for a period of one month active duty.
  2. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB4

    History

    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than one time, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  3. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB3

    History

    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than one time, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  4. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB2

    History

    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than one time, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  5. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB1

    History

    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than one time, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  6. Expert Infantryman Badge, EIB

    History

    The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a special skills badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB), it is a completely different award: while the CIB is awarded to infantrymen for participation in ground combat, the EIB is presented for completion of a course of testing designed to demonstrate proficiency in infantry skills. The EIB was first created in October 1943. Currently, it is awarded to U.S. Army personnel who hold infantry or special forces military occupational specialties. To be awarded the EIB, the soldier must complete a number of prerequisites and pass a battery of graded tests on basic infantry skills.

    Prerequisites
    The Expert Infantryman Badge is awarded to Soldiers who successfully complete the Expert Infantryman Course in the 101st Airborne Division.
  7. Combat Medical Badge, CMB4

    History

    Originally established as the Medical Badge, the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) was created by the War Department on 1 March 1945. It could be awarded to officers, warrant officers, and enlisted Soldier of the Medical Department assigned or attached to the medical detachment of infantry regiments, infantry battalions, and elements thereof designated as infantry in tables of organization or tables of organization and equipment. Its evolution stemmed from a requirement to recognize medical aid-men who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry Soldier. Though established almost a year and a half after the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB), it could be awarded retroactively to 7 December 1941 to fully qualified personnel.

    Prerequisites

    The Combat Medical Badge may be awarded to any soldier who having completed medical training, participates in active combat during an operational mission, while assigned to or filling a dedicated medical role (Aidman). Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the four sides of the badge.

  8. Combat Medical Badge, CMB3

    History

    Originally established as the Medical Badge, the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) was created by the War Department on 1 March 1945. It could be awarded to officers, warrant officers, and enlisted Soldier of the Medical Department assigned or attached to the medical detachment of infantry regiments, infantry battalions, and elements thereof designated as infantry in tables of organization or tables of organization and equipment. Its evolution stemmed from a requirement to recognize medical aid-men who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry Soldier. Though established almost a year and a half after the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB), it could be awarded retroactively to 7 December 1941 to fully qualified personnel.

    Prerequisites

    The Combat Medical Badge may be awarded to any soldier who having completed medical training, participates in active combat during an operational mission, while assigned to or filling a dedicated medical role (Aidman). Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the four sides of the badge.

  9. Combat Medical Badge, CMB2

    History

    Originally established as the Medical Badge, the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) was created by the War Department on 1 March 1945. It could be awarded to officers, warrant officers, and enlisted Soldier of the Medical Department assigned or attached to the medical detachment of infantry regiments, infantry battalions, and elements thereof designated as infantry in tables of organization or tables of organization and equipment. Its evolution stemmed from a requirement to recognize medical aid-men who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry Soldier. Though established almost a year and a half after the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB), it could be awarded retroactively to 7 December 1941 to fully qualified personnel.

    Prerequisites

    The Combat Medical Badge may be awarded to any soldier who having completed medical training, participates in active combat during an operational mission, while assigned to or filling a dedicated medical role (Aidman). Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the four sides of the badge.

  10. Combat Medical Badge, CMB1

    History

    Originally established as the Medical Badge, the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) was created by the War Department on 1 March 1945. It could be awarded to officers, warrant officers, and enlisted Soldier of the Medical Department assigned or attached to the medical detachment of infantry regiments, infantry battalions, and elements thereof designated as infantry in tables of organization or tables of organization and equipment. Its evolution stemmed from a requirement to recognize medical aid-men who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry Soldier. Though established almost a year and a half after the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB), it could be awarded retroactively to 7 December 1941 to fully qualified personnel.

    Prerequisites

    The Combat Medical Badge may be awarded to any soldier who having completed medical training, participates in active combat during an operational mission, while assigned to or filling a dedicated medical role (Aidman). Shall be awarded once per Campaign, up to 4 times. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the four sides of the badge.

  11. U.S. Army Aviator Wings

    History

    The first United States Aviator Badges were issued to members of the Air Service during World War I. The badges were issued in three degrees: Observer (a "US" shield and one left-side wing), Junior Aviator or Reserve Aviation Officer (a "US" shield between two wings), and Senior Aviator (a star over "US" shield between two wings). The Army Air Corps also issued a badge for balloon pilots, known as the Aeronaut Badge. Enlisted Aviators wore their regular rank insignia and the Observer's badge. There were 29 enlisted pilots before the American entry into World War I. The second enlisted aviator, William A. Lamkey, got a discharge and flew for Pancho Villa. The remaining enlisted pilots received commissions in 1917. There were 60 enlisted mechanics who were trained as pilots in France during the war, but they were used for ferrying duties and did not fly in combat. The recruiting and training of enlisted Aviators ended in 1933.

    Prerequisites

    The U.S. Army Aviator Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who successfully complete Aviation School and are inducted into the 4th Fighter Group.

  12. Master Parachutist Badge

    History

    The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the "Parachutist Patch" which had previously worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. Lieutenant General Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Have met requirements and been awarded Senior Parachutist Badge.

    Complete 10 additional (30 total) successful jumps between official Operations and Airborne School(s).

  13. Senior Parachutist Badge

    History

    The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the "Parachutist Patch" which had previously worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. Lieutenant General Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Complete 15 successful jumps between official Operations and Airborne School(s).

  14. Basic Parachutist Badge

    History

    The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the "Parachutist Patch" which had previously worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. Lieutenant General Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    The Basic Parachute Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully complete Airborne School. Once earned, additional awards of the Basic Parachute Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who successfully complete a combat jump during an official operation. These subsequent awards are denoted by stars attached to the badge, 1 bronze star per jump up to 4 total, at which point the 5th combat award is denoted by a single gold star.

  15. Combat Star (5th Award)

    History

    If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Successfully complete 5th combat jump during official  Deployments (Historical, World War II, 101st Airborne Division Jumps)

  16. Combat Star (4th Award)

    History

    If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Successfully complete 4th combat jump during official  Deployments (Historical, World War II, 101st Airborne Division Jumps)

  17. Combat Star (3rd Award)

    History

    If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Successfully complete 3rd combat jump during official Deployments (Historical, World War II, 101st Airborne Division Jumps)

  18. Combat Star (2nd Award)

    History

    If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Successfully complete 2nd combat jump during official Deployments (Historical, World War II, 101st Airborne Division Jumps)

  19. Combat Star

    History

    If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites

    Successfully complete 1st combat jump during official Deployments (Historical, World War II, 101st Airborne Division Jumps)

  20. Marksmanship Badge (Expert)

    History

    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites

    Score 36 - 40 hits with the service rifle during rifle qualification.

  21. Marksmanship Badge (Sharpshooter)

    History

    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites

    Score 30 - 35 hits with the service rifle during rifle qualification.

  22. Marksmanship Badge (Marksman)

    History

    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites

    Score 23 - 29 hits with the service rifle during rifle qualification.

  23. Service Stripes

    History

    In 1777 the French ancien régime army had used Galons d'ancienneté, or "Seniority Braid" (cloth braid chevrons nicknamed brisures > "breaks") worn on the upper sleeves awarded for each seven years of enlistment.[4] Soldiers who wore such emblems were called briscards. The practice was continued in Napoleon Bonaparte's army in which they were awarded for 10, 15, and 20 years of service. The French Army later moved them to the lower sleeves and the rank stripes to the upper sleeves. Service chevrons were worn on the lower left sleeve and Wound Stripes were worn on the lower right sleeve (influencing the American Wound Chevron device).
    Sleeve stripes are worn only by enlisted personnel. U.S. Army soldiers wear their stripes on the bottom cuff of the left sleeve and Overseas Service Bars on the right one. Service stripes are only worn on formal uniforms, and are not seen on work uniforms.

    Prerequisites

    The Service Stripe is authorized to be worn each stripe for three month of service, In contrast to the U.S. Army, a service stripe is authorized for wear by enlisted personnel upon completion of the specified service time frame (three months), regardless of the service member's disciplinary history. For example, a soldier with several non-judicial punishments and courts-martial would still be authorized a service stripe for three months service, although the Good Conduct Medal would be denied.

  24. Appurtenance - Bronze V

    History

    Awarded at discretion of Battalion or Company Commander for Heroism or Valor in combat during an official operation mission. 

    Prerequisites

    May be worn when awarded in conjunction with the following medals and ribbons: Bronze Star, and Army Commendation Medal, any other other award at command discretion.

  25. Appurtenance - Oak Leaf Clusters

    History

    The bronze Oak Leaf Cluster is awarded to and worn by Army personnel on US decorations to denote the second and subsequent awards. A silver Oak Leaf Cluster is worn in lieu of five (5) bronze clusters. Oak Leaf Clusters are also worn on unit citations for the same purpose.

    Prerequisites

    May be worn upon the following awards: Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Army Commendation Medal.

    May also be worn upon the following Unit Citations: Presidential Unit Citation, and Valorous Unit Award.

  26. Appurtenance - Arrowhead

    History

    A bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch tall. It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump during an official operation.

    Prerequisites

    May be worn upon the Operation Ribbon in which the Airborne or Air Assault mission was completed.

  27. Appurtenance - Clasps

    History

    Subsequent Awards of the Good Conduct Medal are represented by a clasp with knots placed on the medal or ribbon.

    Prerequisites

    Bronze clasps indicate the second (two loops) through fifth award (five loops); silver clasps indicate sixth (one loop) through tenth award (five loops); and gold clasps indicate eleventh (one loop) through the fifteenth award (5 loops). 
    Second, fifth, sixth, and tenth award are pictured.

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